Category Archives: related

Try it Free: The Talmud iPad App as Modern Palimpsest

Last week, we discussed the inherent intertextuality of the Jewish Prayer Book. And we explored ancient and modern forms of the palimpsest.

We also looked at the online projects created around the Archimedes Palimpsest, a 13th-century (Christian) prayer book containing erased texts that were written several centuries earlier, most notably two treatises by Archimedes that can be found nowhere else. Among these projects, there is an astounding Google Books display of the original codex.

Essentially, we are considering the textual aspects of Jewish liturgy as a “palimpsest” of sorts, generated through multiple layers of texts and meanings, interpretations and uses. In a way, the text of the liturgy is a conscious palimpsest , since the way in which all layers appear to interact are somewhat intentional. Or not?

News circulated recently online about the ArtScroll iPad app. This is a great example of intentional modern palimpsest. In it, multiple layers of textual sources, interpretive paths, and patterns of usability, seem to coexist within an apparently seamless (digital) interface.

And you can “try it free,” too! ūüėČ

Talmud Bavli iPad App (screenshot)

A Prayer is a Prayer is Prayer (A New Gallery Show in Chelsea)

Andrea Popowich Meislin is an art historian, writer, and independent curator. She was formerly the associate curator of photography at the Israel Museum (Jerusalem), and an independent research associate at the Phoenix Art Museum. Meislin has organized museum and gallery exhibitions, and cataloged numerous significant private collections.

Andrea Meislin’s new gallery space is about to open with a group show featuring nineteen artists whose photographs capture Christian, Jews, Muslims, and Buddhists practicing rituals of prayer across the world — including in China, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Ukraine, and the US.

Read the full press release below, and do take a look at the exhibition website. It may be an additional resource for us to focus on the relationship, and the distinctions, between liturgy and ritual (which, incidentally, is our goal for next week).